Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology

, Volume 7, Issue 1, pp 55–63

Sex attractant of an arctiid moth (Utetheisa ornatrix): A pulsed chemical signal

  • William E. Conner
  • Thomas Eisner
  • Robert K. Vander Meer
  • Angel Guerrero
  • Dario Ghiringelli
  • Jerrold Meinwald
Article

DOI: 10.1007/BF00302519

Cite this article as:
Conner, W.E., Eisner, T., Vander Meer, R.K. et al. Behav Ecol Sociobiol (1980) 7: 55. doi:10.1007/BF00302519

Summary

The sex attractant pheromone produced by the female of the moth Utetheisa ornatrix was shown to contain Z, Z, Z-3, 6, 9-heneicosatriene. The compound, whose structure was confirmed by synthesis, proved active in electroantennogram and field bioassays. Pheromone emission occurs discontinuously, in the form of short pulses (pulse repetition rate=1.5±0.2 pulses/s). It is argued that such temporal patterning — which had not previously been demonstrated for an airborne chemical signal — can provide close-range orientation cues to the male moth as it seeks out the female.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • William E. Conner
    • 1
  • Thomas Eisner
    • 1
  • Robert K. Vander Meer
    • 2
  • Angel Guerrero
    • 2
  • Dario Ghiringelli
    • 2
  • Jerrold Meinwald
    • 2
  1. 1.Section of Neurobiology and BehaviorCornell UniversityIthacaUSA
  2. 2.Department of ChemistryCornell UniversityIthacaUSA

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