Experiments in Fluids

, Volume 5, Issue 3, pp 184–188 | Cite as

An anemometer for highly turbulent or recirculating flows

  • P. A. Durbin
  • D. J. Mckinzie
  • E. J. Durbin
Originals

Abstract

An anemometer which determines flow velocity by ionizing air and sensing the convective displacement of the ions is described. It is suited to measurement in low speed, highly unsteady gas flows. Comparisons to hot wire spectra suggest the corona anemometer has adequate frequency response to make it a useful tool for fluid dynamics measurement.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. A. Durbin
    • 1
  • D. J. Mckinzie
    • 1
  • E. J. Durbin
    • 2
  1. 1.NASA Lewis Research CenterClevelandUSA
  2. 2.Princeton UniversityPrincetonUSA

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