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Coral Reefs

, Volume 5, Issue 3, pp 155–159 | Cite as

Identification and quantitation of near-UV absorbing compounds (S-320) in a hermatypic scleractinian

  • W. C. Dunlap
  • B. E. Chalker
Article

Abstract

Reef-building corals from shallow waters are known to contain a suite of water soluble compounds (collectively named S-320) which strongly absorb near-UV light. Compounds of this type have now been isolated from the Pacific staghor coral Acropora formosa and identified as a series of mycosporine-like amino acids including mycosporine-Gly (λmax=310nm), palythine (λmax=320nm) and palythinol (λmax=332nm). These compounds were separated and quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography. Serial extraction efficiencies were calculated using a simple formula which is derived herein. For 12-cm long coral branches collected from a depth of 3 m at Rib Reef, Great Barrier Reef, Australia (146° 53′E, 18° 29′S) the average concentrations of mycosporine-Gly, palythine, and palythinol were 37.8, 56.4 and 0.895 nmol per mg coral protein, respectively. The coral samples can be stored at-20°C for at least 144 days without degradation of the mycosporinelike amino acids.

Keywords

Chromatography Liquid Chromatography Shallow Water Average Concentration Extraction Efficiency 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. C. Dunlap
    • 1
  • B. E. Chalker
    • 1
  1. 1.Australian Institute of Marine ScienceTownsville M.C.Australia

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