Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology

, Volume 12, Issue 1, pp 5–9 | Cite as

Call-system similarity in a ground-living social bird and a mammal in the Bush habitat

  • V. Maier
  • O. A. E. Rasa
  • H. Scheich
Article

Summary

The vocal repertoires of two sympatric East African animals were compared: the dwarf mongoose (Helogale undulata rufula) and the guinea-fowl (Numida meleagris sp.). Both species live socially and have extensive vocal repertoires, which were found to be very similar with respect to acoustic structure and the context in which the call-types were used. Several factors are discussed that may have favoured the evolution of such similarities.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. Maier
    • 1
  • O. A. E. Rasa
    • 2
  • H. Scheich
    • 1
  1. 1.Institut für ZoologieTechnische Hochschule DarmstadtDarmstadtFederal Republic of Germany
  2. 2.Lehrstuhl für TierphysiologieUniversität BayreuthBayreuthFederal Republic of Germany

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