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Polymer Bulletin

, Volume 37, Issue 2, pp 237–244 | Cite as

Gelation of poly(vinyl alcohol) in dimethyl sulfoxide/water solvent

  • Hiroshi Hoshino
  • Susumu Okada
  • Hiroshi Urakawa
  • Kanji Kajiwara
Article

Summary

Gelation of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)/water was observed at 23°C with viscometry, spectrophotometry, wide angle X-ray scattering and light scattering. Here transparent gel formation was found to take place prior to being turbid in some cases, whereas the solution became turbid prior to gelation in other cases. Whether transparent gel is formed at first or solution becomes turbid, depends on DMSO composition. PVA solution forms gel in the DMSO composition range from 20 to 80 wt.%. Below the boundary DMSO composition of 60–70 wt.%, gelation takes place at first (i.e. transparent gel is formed) and then becomes turbid eventually, while beyond this DMSO composition the solution becomes turbid and then opaque gel is formed.

Keywords

DMSO Dimethyl Vinyl Light Scattering Sulfoxide 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hiroshi Hoshino
    • 1
  • Susumu Okada
    • 1
  • Hiroshi Urakawa
    • 1
  • Kanji Kajiwara
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculty of Engineering and DesignKyoto Institute of TechnologyKyotoJapan

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