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Mammalian Genome

, Volume 6, Issue 3, pp 157–175 | Cite as

The PiGMaP consortium linkage map of the pig (Sus scrofa)

  • A. L. Archibald
  • C. S. Haley
  • J. F. Brown
  • S. Couperwhite
  • H. A. McQueen
  • D. Nicholson
  • W. Coppieters
  • A. Van de Weghe
  • A. Stratil
  • A. K. Winterø
  • M. Fredholm
  • N. J. Larsen
  • V. H. Nielsen
  • D. Milan
  • N. Woloszyn
  • A. Robic
  • M. Dalens
  • J. Riquet
  • J. Gellin
  • J. -C. Caritez
  • G. Burgaud
  • L. Ollivier
  • J. -P. Bidanel
  • M. Vaiman
  • C. Renard
  • H. Geldermann
  • R. Davoli
  • D. Ruyter
  • E. J. M. Verstege
  • M. A. M. Groenen
  • W. Davies
  • B. Høyheim
  • A. Keiserud
  • L. Andersson
  • H. Ellegren
  • M. Johansson
  • L. Marklund
  • J. R. Miller
  • D. V. Anderson Dear
  • E. Signer
  • A. J. Jeffreys
  • C. Moran
  • P. Le Tissier
  • Muladno
  • M. F. Rothschild
  • C. K. Tuggle
  • D. Vaske
  • J. Helm
  • H. -C. Liu
  • A. Rahman
  • T. -P. Yu
  • R. G. Larson
  • C. B. Schmitz
Special Reports

Abstract

A linkage map of the porcine genome has been developed by segregation analysis of 239 genetic markers. Eighty-one of these markers correspond to known genes. Linkage groups have been assigned to all 18 autosomes plus the X Chromosome (Chr). As 69 of the markers on the linkage map have also been mapped physically (by others), there is significant integration of linkage and physical map data. Six informative markers failed to show linkage to these maps. As in other species, the genetic map of the heterogametic sex (male) was significantly shorter (∼16.5 Morgans) than the genetic map of the homogametic sex (female) (∼21.5 Morgans). The sex-averaged genetic map of the pig was estimated to be ∼18 Morgans in length. Mapping information for 61 Type I loci (genes) enhances the contribution of the pig gene map to comparative gene mapping. Because the linkage map incorporates both highly polymorphic Type II loci, predominantly microsatellites, and Type I loci, it will be useful both for large experiments to map quantitative trait loci and for the subsequent isolation of trait genes following a comparative and candidate gene approach.

Keywords

Quantitative Trait Locus Linkage Group Segregation Analysis Candidate Gene Approach Informative Marker 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. L. Archibald
    • 1
  • C. S. Haley
    • 1
  • J. F. Brown
    • 1
  • S. Couperwhite
    • 1
  • H. A. McQueen
    • 1
  • D. Nicholson
    • 1
  • W. Coppieters
    • 2
  • A. Van de Weghe
    • 2
  • A. Stratil
    • 3
  • A. K. Winterø
    • 4
  • M. Fredholm
    • 4
  • N. J. Larsen
    • 5
  • V. H. Nielsen
    • 5
  • D. Milan
    • 6
  • N. Woloszyn
    • 6
  • A. Robic
    • 6
  • M. Dalens
    • 6
  • J. Riquet
    • 6
  • J. Gellin
    • 6
  • J. -C. Caritez
    • 7
  • G. Burgaud
    • 7
  • L. Ollivier
    • 8
  • J. -P. Bidanel
    • 8
  • M. Vaiman
    • 9
  • C. Renard
    • 9
  • H. Geldermann
    • 10
  • R. Davoli
    • 11
  • D. Ruyter
    • 12
  • E. J. M. Verstege
    • 12
  • M. A. M. Groenen
    • 12
  • W. Davies
    • 13
  • B. Høyheim
    • 13
  • A. Keiserud
    • 13
  • L. Andersson
    • 14
  • H. Ellegren
    • 14
  • M. Johansson
    • 14
  • L. Marklund
    • 14
  • J. R. Miller
    • 15
  • D. V. Anderson Dear
    • 15
  • E. Signer
    • 16
  • A. J. Jeffreys
    • 16
  • C. Moran
    • 17
  • P. Le Tissier
    • 17
  • Muladno
    • 17
  • M. F. Rothschild
    • 18
  • C. K. Tuggle
    • 18
  • D. Vaske
    • 18
  • J. Helm
    • 18
  • H. -C. Liu
    • 18
  • A. Rahman
    • 18
  • T. -P. Yu
    • 18
  • R. G. Larson
    • 18
  • C. B. Schmitz
    • 18
  1. 1.Roslin Institute (Edinburgh)RoslinUK
  2. 2.State University of GhentMerelbekeBelgium
  3. 3.Institute of Animal Physiology and GeneticsLibechovCzech Republic
  4. 4.The Royal Agricultural and Veterinary UniversityCopenhagenDenmark
  5. 5.National Institute of Animal ScienceFoulumDenmark
  6. 6.INRA Laboratoire de Génétique CellulaireToulouseFrance
  7. 7.INRA Domaine Pluridisciplinaire du MagneraudSurgèresFrance
  8. 8.INRA Station de Génétique Quantitative et AppliquéeJouy-en-JosasFrance
  9. 9.INRA-CEA Laboratoire de Radiobiologie AppliquéeJouy-en-JosasFrance
  10. 10.Universität HohenheimStuttgartGermany
  11. 11.Universita degli Studi di BolognaItaly
  12. 12.Wageningen Agricultural UniversityWageningenThe Netherlands
  13. 13.Norwegian College of Veterinary MedicineOsloNorway
  14. 14.Swedish University of Agricultural SciencesUppsalaSweden
  15. 15.Babraham InstituteCambridgeUK
  16. 16.Department of GeneticsUniversity of LeicesterLeicesterUK
  17. 17.University of SydneySydneyAustralia
  18. 18.Iowa State UniversityAmesUSA

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