Sex Roles

, Volume 28, Issue 7–8, pp 461–476 | Cite as

Effects of gender and gender role identification of participant and type of social support resource on support seeking

  • William A. Ashton
  • Ann Fuehrer
Article

Abstract

The relationship between type of social support resource (emotional vs. instrumental support) sought and gender and gender role identification was examined. Gender-typed and androgynous, white, middle to upper middle class males and females were given scenarios describing situations in which help was needed, and which also identified a female helper who would provide either emotional or instrumental support. The results indicated that males reported a significantly lower likelihood of seeking emotional support than instrumental support, while no significant differences were found between levels of seeking emotional and instrumental support for females. In comparing men and women for each type of support, it was found that males reported a significantly lower likelihood of seeking emotional support than did females. In addition, gender-typed males reported seeking emotional support significantly less than did the other three groups: androgynous males and females, and gender-typed females.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • William A. Ashton
    • 1
  • Ann Fuehrer
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologySt. Olaf CollegeNorthfield
  2. 2.Miami UniversityUSA

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