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Sex Roles

, Volume 24, Issue 7–8, pp 489–509 | Cite as

The transition from middle childhood to early adolescence: Sex differences in the social network and perceived self-competence

  • Candice Feiring
  • Michael Lewis
Article

Abstract

This study concerns the development of social networks from middle childhood to early adolescence. On a longitudinal sample of 100 children seen at 9 and 13 years of age, three basic questions were addressed: 1) age changes, 2) sex differences, and 3) the relation between network characteristics and self-perceived competence in early adolescence. The number of and frequency of contact with kin, adults and friends for each subject were assessed at 9 and 13 years using maternal report. Teenager report of academic, social, athletic and behavioral conduct was also collected. The transition to early adolescence was marked by several changes in the social network. At 13 years networks become more age segregated. Both opposite and same sex friends show an increase. Sex differences were also evident. For example, adolescent girls had a larger network of friends than boys. Adolescent boys had less segregated adult networks. For adolescent girls but not boys, the friendship network was related to specific types of competence.

Keywords

Social Network Social Psychology Adolescent Girl Early Adolescence Large Network 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Candice Feiring
    • 1
  • Michael Lewis
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute for the Study of Child DevelopmentRobert Wood Johnson Medical SchoolNew Brunswick

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