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Sex Roles

, Volume 23, Issue 7–8, pp 413–419 | Cite as

Gender stereotypes and dimensions of effective leader behavior

  • Arnie Cann
  • William D. Siegfried
Article

Abstract

Research has consistently found that effective leadership is perceived as characterized by traits similar to those associated with masculine gender roles. These perceptions would appear to be at odds with extensive research indicating that effective leadership requires “consideration” and “structuring” behaviors—behaviors that seem to represent both masculine and feminine styles. In two separate studies, the correspondence between gender stereotypes and dimensions of effective leadership were assessed. Results indicate that consideration behaviors are perceived to be feminine, while structuring behaviors are perceived to be masculine. Similarly, qualities that characterize the masculine gender role are perceived to be consistent with structuring, while qualities associated with the feminine gender roles are perceived to be consistent with consideration. It is suggested that an increased awareness of the “androgynous” nature of effective leadership behaviors might weaken the biases in favor of male leaders.

Keywords

Social Psychology Gender Role Separate Study Gender Stereotype Leader Behavior 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Arnie Cann
    • 1
  • William D. Siegfried
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of North Carolina at CharlotteCharlotte

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