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Molecular and General Genetics MGG

, Volume 246, Issue 3, pp 381–386 | Cite as

Male recombination with single and homologous P elements in Drosophila melanogaster

  • John A. Sved
  • Leila M. Blackman
  • Yasmine Svoboda
  • Rebecca Colless
Original Paper

Abstract

It has previously been shown that, in the presence of a source of P element transposase, male recombination in Drosophila melanogaster is induced at a rate of about 1% in the region of a single P[CaSpeR] element. This paper shows that recombinant chromosomes retain unaltered P[CaSpeR] elements at the original site in a high proportion of cases. This result is incompatible with a simple model in which recombination occurs by resolution of a Holliday junction following P element excision and repair. It has also previously been shown that homozygous regions containing a P element produce male recombination levels of 10–20%, an order of magnitude higher than that given by a single element. This paper shows that reciprocal recombinant chromosomes retaining P[CaSpeR] elements can be combined to produce similarly high levels of recombination. This result potentially allows for recombinant chromosomes from homologous recombination to be analysed at the molecular level in the region of the inserted element.

Key words

P element Transposon Drosophila Recombination Homologous 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • John A. Sved
    • 1
  • Leila M. Blackman
    • 1
  • Yasmine Svoboda
    • 1
  • Rebecca Colless
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Biological Sciences A12University of SydneyAustralia

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