Sex Roles

, Volume 8, Issue 4, pp 345–357 | Cite as

Sex differences in achievement self-attributions: An effect-size analysis

  • David Sohn

Abstract

An effect-size analysis of the findings on sex differences in the use of achievement self-attributions was performed to determine if there were relationships between these two variables that accounted for more than 5% of the variance. The effect-size index used was an estimate of omega squared (ω2). Two kinds of sex difference effects were examined: (a) the main effect for sex and (b) the simple sex difference effects for success and failure, respectively. With the exception of luck attributions for success, whose ω2 was .01, all ω2s were less than .01. It was concluded that the studies surveyed provided no evidence of the existence of consequential relationships between sex, achievement, and self-attributions.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • David Sohn
    • 1
  1. 1.University of North Carolina at CharlotteUSA

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