Human Genetics

, Volume 75, Issue 3, pp 213–216 | Cite as

DNA microextraction from dried blood spots on filter paper blotters: potential applications to newborn screening

  • Edward R. B. McCabe
  • Shu-Zhen Huang
  • William K. Seltzer
  • Martha L. Law
Original Investigations

Summary

Microextraction of DNA from dried blood specimens would ease specimen transport to centralized laboratory facilities for recombinant DNA diagnosis in the same manner as use of dried blood spots allowed the broad application of screening tests to newborn populations. A method is described which reproducibly yields 0.5μg DNA from the dried equivalent of 50μl whole blood. Though DNA yields decreased with storage of dried specimens at room temperature, good-quality DNA was still obtained. Sufficient DNA was routinely obtained for Southern blot analysis using repetitive and unique sequences. This microextraction procedure will allow immediate application of molecular genetic technology to direct newborn screening follow-up of disorders amenable to DNA diagnosis, such as sickle cell anemia, and may eventually permit primary DNA screening for specific mutations.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edward R. B. McCabe
    • 1
    • 2
  • Shu-Zhen Huang
    • 1
    • 3
  • William K. Seltzer
    • 1
    • 2
  • Martha L. Law
    • 1
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of PediatricsUniversity of Colorado School of MedicineDenverUSA
  2. 2.Department of Biochemistry, Biophysics, and GeneticsUnivesity of Colorado School of MedicineDenverUSA
  3. 3.Laboratory of Medical GeneticsShanghai Children's HospitalShanghaiPeoples Republic of China
  4. 4.Eleanor Roosevelt Institute for Cancer ResearchDenverUSA

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