Human Genetics

, Volume 74, Issue 4, pp 346–352 | Cite as

Detection of chromosome aberrations in the human interphase nucleus by visualization of specific target DNAs with radioactive and non-radioactive in situ hybridization techniques: diagnosis of trisomy 18 with probe L1.84

  • T. Cremer
  • J. Landegent
  • A. Brückner
  • H. P. Scholl
  • M. Schardin
  • H. D. Hager
  • P. Devilee
  • P. Pearson
  • M. van der Ploeg
Original Investigations

Summary

The localization of chromosome 18 in human interphase nuclei is demonstrated by use of radioactive and nonradioactive in situ hybridization techniques with a DNA clone designated L1.84. This clone represents a distinct subpopulation of the repetitive human alphoid DNA family, located in the centric region of chromosome 18. Under stringent hybridization conditions hybridization of L1.84 is restricted to chromosome 18 and reflects the number of these chromosomes present in the nuclei, namely, two in normal diploid human cells and three in nuclei from cells with trisomy 18. Under conditions of low stringency, cross-hybridization with other subpopulations of the alphoid DNA family occurs in the centromeric regions of the whole chromosome complement, and numerous hybridization sites are detected over interphase nuclei. Detection of chromosome-specific target DNAs by non-radioactive in situ hybridization with appropriate DNA probes cloned from individual chromosomal subregions presents a rapid means of identifying directly numerical or even structural chromosome aberrations in the interphase nucleus. Present limitations and future applications of interphase cytogenetics are discussed.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. Cremer
    • 1
  • J. Landegent
    • 2
  • A. Brückner
    • 1
  • H. P. Scholl
    • 1
  • M. Schardin
    • 1
  • H. D. Hager
    • 1
  • P. Devilee
    • 3
  • P. Pearson
    • 3
  • M. van der Ploeg
    • 2
  1. 1.Institut für Anthropologie und Humangenetik der UniversitätHeidelbergGermany
  2. 2.Department of Histochemistry and CytochemistryState UniversityLeidenThe Netherlands
  3. 3.Department of Human Genetics, Sylvius LaboratoriesState UniversityLeidenThe Netherlands

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