Nimodipine in migraine: clinical efficacy and endocrinological effects

  • R. Formisano
  • P. Falaschi
  • R. Cerbo
  • A. Proietti
  • T. Catarci
  • R. D'Urso
  • C. Roberti
  • V. Aloise
  • F. Chiarotti
  • A. Agnoli
Short Communications

Summary

Serum prolactin is increased during chronic flunarizine treatment of patients suffering from migraine. In order to clarify the role of calcium in control of the secretion of anterior pituitary hormones, a study has now been made of the effects of chronic nimodipine and propranolol treatment of migraine patients on prolactin (PRL), luteinizing hormone (LH) and growth hormone (GH) levels. 11 patients were treated with nimodipine and 8 with propranolol for four months. A statistically significant reduction in the frequency of the attacks was demonstrated in both groups. No significant change was found in the hormones levels during nimodipine treatment.

Key words

Migraine nimodipine propranolol prolactin luteinizing hormone growth hormone adverse effects 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Formisano
    • 1
  • P. Falaschi
    • 2
  • R. Cerbo
    • 1
  • A. Proietti
    • 3
  • T. Catarci
    • 1
  • R. D'Urso
    • 3
  • C. Roberti
    • 1
  • V. Aloise
    • 3
  • F. Chiarotti
    • 4
  • A. Agnoli
    • 1
  1. 1.1st Chair Department of Neurological Sciences“La Sapienza” University of RomeItaly
  2. 2.Chair of Emergency Medicine, 1st Faculty of MedicineUniversity of NaplesItaly
  3. 3.1st Medical Clinic“La Sapienza” University of RomeItaly
  4. 4.Istituto Superiore di Sanita'RomeItaly

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