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European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology

, Volume 39, Issue 2, pp 193–194 | Cite as

Pharmacokinetics and protein binding of methocarbamol in renal insufficiency and normals

  • D. A. Sica
  • T. J. Comstock
  • J. Davis
  • L. Manning
  • R. Powell
  • A. Melikian
  • G. Wright
Short Communications

Summary

We determined plasma methocarbamol concentrations over 24 h following a 1.5 g methocarbamol dose (off-dialysis day) to 8 chronic haemodialysis patients and compared these results to those from 17 healthy male volunteers.

The harmonic mean elimination half-life was similar between the two groups, 1.24 and 1.14 h, respectively. tmax and the weight-adjusted Cmax were 1.1 h and 27.0 mg · m−1 for haemodialysis patients and 1.1 and 23.1 mg · l−1 for normals. Relative systemic availability was assessed by comparing weight-normalized AUC × k10 products.

These results indicate no significant differences with respect to methocarbamol absorption, with the relative systemic availability in patients being 113%.

These data suggest that absorption and elimination of methocarbamol is similar between normal subjects and patients undergoing maintenance haemodialysis.

Key words

methocarbamol haemodialysis pharmacokinetics 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. A. Sica
    • 1
  • T. J. Comstock
    • 2
  • J. Davis
    • 1
  • L. Manning
    • 3
  • R. Powell
    • 3
  • A. Melikian
    • 3
  • G. Wright
    • 3
  1. 1.Renal Pharmacology SectionDivision of NephrologyRichmond
  2. 2.Department of Pharmacy and PharmaceuticsMedical College of VirginiaRichmond
  3. 3.Department of Drug MetabolismA. H. Robins Co.Richmond

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