Human Genetics

, Volume 73, Issue 4, pp 301–303 | Cite as

Clustered GATA repeats (Bkm sequences) on the human Y chromosome

  • J. Arnemann
  • Sibylle Jakubiczka
  • J. Schmidtke
  • Renate Schäfer
  • J. T. Epplen
Original Investigations

Summary

Sixty eight individual clones of a human Y chromosome cosmid library were screened for the presence of GATA. repeats, the major component of Bkm-related DNA sequences. Nine cosmid clones were found to cross-hybridize. The sequence organization of the repetitive base quadruplet GATA was analyzed using synthetic oligonucleotide probes. Subclones of GATA-positive cosmid clones were used for chromosomal localization of the Y-derived DNA sequences thus revealing male-specificity or male-female homology.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Arnemann
    • 1
  • Sibylle Jakubiczka
    • 1
  • J. Schmidtke
    • 1
  • Renate Schäfer
    • 2
  • J. T. Epplen
    • 2
  1. 1.Institut für Humangenetik der UniversitätGöttingenGermany
  2. 2.Junfor Research UnitMax-Planck-Institut für ImmunbiologieFreiburgGermany

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