Archives of Microbiology

, Volume 158, Issue 6, pp 418–421 | Cite as

Formation of thionates by freshwater and marine strains of sulfate-reducing bacteria

  • H. Sass
  • J. Steuber
  • M. Kroder
  • P. M. H. Kroneck
  • H. Cypionka
Original Papers

Abstract

The formation of thionates (thiosulfate, trithionate and tetrahionate) during the reduction of sulfate or sulfite was studied with four marine and four freshwater strains of sulfate-reducing bacteria. Growing cultures of two strains of the freshwater species Desulfovibrio desulfuricans formed up to 400 μM thiosulfate and 100 μM trithionate under conditions of electron donor limitation. Tetrathionate was observed in lower concentrations of up to 30 μM. Uncoupler-treated washed cells of the four freshwater strains formed thiosulfate and trithionate at low electron donor concentrations with sulfite in excess. In contrast, only one of four marine strains formed thionates. The freshwater strain Desulfobulbus propionicus transformed sulfite almost completely to thiosulfate and trithionate. The amounts produced increased with time, concentration of added sulfite and cell density. Tetrathionate was detected only occasionally and in low concentrations, and was probably formed by chemical oxidation of thiosulfate. The results confirm the diversity of the sulfite reduction pathways in sulfate-reducing bacteria, and suggest that thiosulfate and trithionate are normal by-products of sulfate reduction.

Key words

Dissimilatory sulfate reduction Sulfite Thiosulfate Trithionate Desulfovibrio desulfuricans Desulfobulbus propionicus 

Abbreviations

CCCP

carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Sass
    • 1
  • J. Steuber
    • 1
  • M. Kroder
    • 1
  • P. M. H. Kroneck
    • 1
  • H. Cypionka
    • 1
  1. 1.Fakultät für BiologieUniversität KonstanzKonstanzFederal Republic of Germany

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