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Molecular and General Genetics MGG

, Volume 110, Issue 1, pp 86–100 | Cite as

Breeding systems in fungi and their significance for genetic recombination

  • Karl Esser
Article

Summary

Breeding systems control the bringing together of genetic material for karyogamy and meiosis as a prerequisite for recombination. Choosing the fungi as an example, the following breeding systems are described on the basis of their genetic determinants: monoecism, dioecism, homogenic incompatibility, and heterokaryosis. Heterogenic incompatibility is emphasized, since this system has been discovered quite recently. The action and interaction of these systems with respect to their control of recombination is discussed and brought into a general scheme (Fig. 7).

Keywords

Recombination General Scheme Genetic Material Genetic Determinant Breeding System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1971

Authors and Affiliations

  • Karl Esser
    • 1
  1. 1.Institut für Allgemeine BotanikRuhr-Universität BochumGermany

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