Intensive Care Medicine

, Volume 11, Issue 6, pp 300–303 | Cite as

The haemostatic effects of hydroxyethyl starch (HES) used as a volume expander

  • E. Macintyre
  • I. J. Mackie
  • D. Ho
  • J. Tinker
  • C. Bullen
  • S. J. Machin
Original Articles

Abstract

Hydroxyethyl starch (HES 450.000/0.7; Hespan 6.0 g/100 ml) was compared with standard crystalloid solutions in postoperative volume replacement in 20 patients undergoing routine orthopaedic surgery. The HES group showed no clinical evidence of haemorrhage and no laboratory evidence of significant haemostatic defects as assessed by standard coagulation tests, platelet aggregation and fibrinogen concentrations. There was a slight shortening in the thrombin time and a smaller increase in postoperative FVIII RAg and FVIII RCof levels in the HES group. HES is a safe and effective volume expander for postoperative use.

Key words

Hydroxyethyl starch (HES) Factor VIII complex Platelets 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. Macintyre
    • 1
  • I. J. Mackie
    • 1
  • D. Ho
    • 1
  • J. Tinker
    • 2
  • C. Bullen
    • 2
  • S. J. Machin
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of HaematologyMiddlesex HospitalLondonUK
  2. 2.Department of Intensive Care MedicineMiddlesex HospitalLondonUK

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