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Human Genetics

, Volume 70, Issue 2, pp 101–108 | Cite as

Electrophoretic variants of blood proteins in Japanese. IV. Prevalence and enzymologic characteristics of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase variants in Hiroshima and Nagasaki

  • T. Kageoka
  • C. Satoh
  • K. Goriki
  • M. Fujita
  • S. Neriishi
  • K. Yamamura
  • J. Kaneko
  • N. Masunari
Original Investigations

Summary

Electrophoretic screening of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.49, G6PD) was conducted one sample of 9,260 children born to the atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima (Honshu) and Nagasaki (Kyushu). The prevalence of electrophoretic variants was 0.11% in males and 0.42% in females in Hiroshima, and 0.16% in males and 0.31% in females in Nagasaki. Enzymologic characteristics of 10 variants obtained from three males and seven hemizygous fathers of heterozygous females were examined. As a result, three new types of G6PD variants were identified among five variants detected in Hiroshima, and three new types among five variants in Nagasaki. All the variants except one belonged to Class 3, as defined by Yoshida et al. (1971).

Keywords

Internal Medicine Metabolic Disease Atomic Bomb Blood Protein Atomic Bomb Survivor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. Kageoka
    • 1
  • C. Satoh
    • 1
  • K. Goriki
    • 1
  • M. Fujita
    • 1
  • S. Neriishi
    • 1
  • K. Yamamura
    • 1
  • J. Kaneko
    • 1
  • N. Masunari
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Biochemical Genetics, Department of Clinical LaboratoriesRadiation Effects Research FoundationHiroshimaJapan

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