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Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology

, Volume 20, Issue 5, pp 291–295 | Cite as

Improvement of production of l-aspartic acid using immobilized microbial cells

  • Isao Umemura
  • Satoru Takamatsu
  • Tadashi Sato
  • Tetsuya Tosa
  • Ichiro Chibata
Biotechnology

Summary

In our laboratory, EAPc-7 a strain having higher aspartase activity was derived from Escherichia coli ATCC 11303. For the improvement of l-aspartic acid productivity using EAPc-7 cells immobilized in χ-carrageenan, it was necessary to eliminate the fumarase activity which converts fumaric acid to l-malic acid. Several treatments for specifically eliminating fumarase activity from EAPc-7 cells were tested and it was found that when EAPc-7 cells were treated in a culture broth (pH 4.9) containing 50 mM l-aspartic acid at 45° C for 1 h, fumarase activity was almost completely eliminated without inactivation of the aspartase.

The treated cells, immobilized in χ-carrageenan, were used for continuous production of l-aspartic acid from ammonium fumarate. The formation of l-malic acid was negligible and the half-life of the immobilized preparation was 126 days.

Productivity of immobilized preparation of treated EAPc-7 cells in l-aspartic acid production was six times of that of the parent cell preparation.

Keywords

Ammonium Escherichia Coli Acid Production Culture Broth Fumarate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Isao Umemura
    • 1
  • Satoru Takamatsu
    • 1
  • Tadashi Sato
    • 1
  • Tetsuya Tosa
    • 1
  • Ichiro Chibata
    • 2
  1. 1.Research Laboratory for Applied BiochemistryTanabe Seiyaku Co., Ltd.OsakaJapan
  2. 2.Research and Development HeadquatersTanabe Seiyaku Co., Ltd.OsakaJapan

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