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Plant Cell Reports

, Volume 8, Issue 11, pp 656–659 | Cite as

Somatic hybrid plants from sexually incompatible woody species: Citrus reticulata and Citropsis gilletiana

  • J. W. Grosser
  • F. G. GmitterJr.
  • N. Tusa
  • J. L. Chandler
Article

Summary

Allotetraploid intergeneric somatic hybrid plants between Citrus reticulata Blanco cv. Cleopatra mandarin and Citropsis gilletiana Swing. & M. Kell. (common name Gillet's cherry orange) were regenerated following protoplast fusion. Cleopatra protoplasts were isolated from an ovule-derived embryogenic suspension culture and fused chemically with leaf-derived protoplasts of Citropsis gilletiana. Cleopatra mandarin and somatic hybrid plants were regenerated via somatic embryogenesis. Hybrid plant identification was based on differential leaf morphology, root-tip cell chromosome number, and electrophoretic analyses of phosphoglucose mutase (PGM) and phosphohexose isomerase (PHI) isozyme banding patterns. This is the first somatic hybrid within the Rutaceae reported that does not have Citrus sinensis (sweet orange) as a parent, and the first produced with a commercially important citrus rootstock and a complementary but sexually incompatible, related species.

Keywords

Somatic Embryogenesis Somatic Hybrid Protoplast Fusion Sweet Orange Phosphoglucose 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Abbreviations

PGM

phosphoglucose mutase

PHI

phosphohexose isomerase

MES

2[N-morpholino] ethane sulfonic acid

BH3

protoplast culture medium (Grosser and Chandler, 1987)

PEG

polyethylene glycol

MT

Murashige and Tucker (1969) basal medium

NAA

1-naphthaleneacetic acid

GA3

gibberellic acid

H+H and EME

citrus embryogenic cell culture media (Grosser and Gmitter, 1990b)

B

embryo germination medium

RMAN

rooting medium

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. W. Grosser
    • 1
  • F. G. GmitterJr.
    • 1
  • N. Tusa
    • 2
  • J. L. Chandler
    • 1
  1. 1.Citrus Research and Education CenterUniversity of Florida, IFASLake AlfredUSA
  2. 2.Centro di Studio del C.N.R. per il Miglioramento Genetico degli AgrumiPalermoItaly

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