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Plant Cell Reports

, Volume 8, Issue 11, pp 651–655 | Cite as

Biotransformation of 5βH-pregnan-3βol-20-one and cardenolides in cell suspension cultures of Nerium oleander L.

  • Dietrich H. Paper
  • Gerhard Franz
Article

Summary

In order to demonstrate enzyme activities playing a role in the biosynthesis of cardenolides and 2,6-dideoxysugars, 5βH-pregnan-3βol-20-one and cardenolides (digitoxigenin, oleandrigenin/L-oleandrose, oleandrin, neriifolin, digitoxigeninmonodigitoxoside and strospeside) were fed to cell suspension cultures of Nerium oleander L.. It could be shown that cell suspension cultures of Nerium oleander L. are able to oxidize, isomerize and glucosylate 5βH-steroidaglycones at C-3. The respective glucosides of the 5βH-steroid-aglycones are the main biotransformation products. These cell cultures are an appropriate tool for the production of labelled 5βH-steroidglucosides.

Keywords

Cell Culture Enzyme Activity Cell Suspension Suspension Culture Glucoside 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Abbreviations

2,4-D

2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid

IAA

indole-3-acetic acid

EtOAc

ethylacetate

MeOH

methanol

MS

Murashige & Skoog

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dietrich H. Paper
    • 1
  • Gerhard Franz
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Pharmaceutical BiologyUniversity of RegensburgRegensburgFederal Republic of Germany

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