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Molecular and General Genetics MGG

, Volume 225, Issue 2, pp 340–341 | Cite as

A new specific DNA endonuclease activity in yeast mitochondria

  • B. Sargueil
  • A. Delahodde
  • D. Hatat
  • G. L. Tian
  • J. Lazowska
  • C. Jacg
Short communications

Summary

Two group I intron-encoded proteins from the yeast mitochondrial genome have already been shown to have a specific DNA endonuclease activity. This activity mediates intron insertion by cleaving the DNA sequence corresponding to the splice junction of an intronless strain. We have discovered in mitochondrial extracts from the yeast strain 777-3A a new DNA endonuclease activity which cleaves the fused exon A3-exon A4 junction sequence of the COXI gene.

Key words

Intron Group I DNA endonuclease Mitochondria Saccharomyces cerevisiae 

References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. Sargueil
    • 1
  • A. Delahodde
    • 1
  • D. Hatat
    • 1
  • G. L. Tian
    • 2
  • J. Lazowska
    • 2
  • C. Jacg
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratoire de Génétique Moléculaire CNRS UA 1302Paris Cedex 05France
  2. 2.Centre de Génétique MoléculaireLaboratoire propre du CNRS associé à l'Université P. et M. CurieGif-sur-YvetteFrance

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