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Molecular and General Genetics MGG

, Volume 150, Issue 3, pp 225–230 | Cite as

Chromosomal behaviour in somatic hybrids of soybean-Nicotiana glauca

  • K. N. Kao
Article

Summary

Protoplasts of soybean and N. glauca were induced to fuse with polyethylene glycol (PEG 1540). Up to 39% of the protoplasts in the treated population were heterokaryocytes. When the heterokaryocytes were isolated and individually cultivated they divided indefinitely and each produced many millions of cells within 2–3 months.

The chromosomal behaviour of soybean and N. glauca in the hybrids were not synchronous in the first few cell generations and the chromosomes of N. glauca had a tendency to stick together and break into pieces. However, some of the N. glauca chromosomes were still retained in the somatic hybrids after 6 months of culturing. The chromosomes of the N. glauca were reconstructed in such a way that in the later cell generations, the movement of the N. glauca chromosomes were in synchrony with the soybean chromosomes.

Keywords

Polyethylene Glycol Polyethylene Glycol Cell Generation Somatic Hybrid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. N. Kao
    • 1
  1. 1.Prairie Regional LaboratoryNational Research Council of CanadaSaskatoonCanada

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