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Molecular and General Genetics MGG

, Volume 109, Issue 4, pp 298–302 | Cite as

Ribosomal proteins

XVI. Altered S4 proteins inEscherichia coli revertants from streptomycin dependence to independence
  • E. Deusser
  • G. Stöffler
  • H. G. Wittmann
  • D. Apirion
Article

Summary

Thirteen phenotypic revertants from streptomycin dependence were independently isolated. The ribosomal proteins from these mutants were extracted and analyzed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and by immunological methods. In four of these mutants examined, alterations in protein S4 were detected by a change in electrophoretic mobility. Three additional mutants have S4 proteins which are indistinguishable from the wild type in two-dimensional electrophoresis but which are clearly different in their immunological properties. Further analysis should reveal whether suppression of the streptomycin independent phenotype is always caused by an alteration in protein S4.

Keywords

Electrophoresis Polyacrylamide Streptomycin Ribosomal Protein Electrophoretic Mobility 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1970

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. Deusser
    • 1
  • G. Stöffler
    • 1
  • H. G. Wittmann
    • 1
  • D. Apirion
    • 2
  1. 1.Max-Planck-Institut für Molekulare GenetikBerlin-DahlemGermany
  2. 2.Department of MicrobiologyWashington University, School of MedicineSt. Louis

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