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Histochemistry

, Volume 93, Issue 1, pp 27–29 | Cite as

Are the polarization colors of Picrosirius red-stained collagen determined only by the diameter of the fibers?

  • D. Dayan
  • Y. Hiss
  • A. Hirshberg
  • J. J. Bubis
  • M. Wolman
Article

Summary

Polarization colors of various purified collagens were studied in fibers of similar thickness. Three different soluble collagens of type I, insoluble collagen type I, lathyritic collagen type I, two p-N-collagens type I, pepsin extract collagen type II, two soluble collagens type III, p-N-collagen type III, and soluble collagen type V were submitted to a routine histopathologic procedure of fixation, preparation of 5-μm-thick sections, staining with Picrosirius red and examination under crossed polars. Polarization colors were determined for thin fibers (0.8 μm or less) and thick fibers, (1.6–2.4 μm). Most thin fibers of collagens and p-N-collagens showed green to yellowish-green polarization collors with no marked differences between the various samples. Thick fibers of all p-N-collagens, lathyritic and normal 0.15 M NaCl-soluble collagens showed green to greenish-yellow polarization colors, while in all other collagens, polarization colors of longer wavelengths (from yellowish-orange to red) were observed. These data suggested that fiber thickness was not the only factor involved in determining the polarization colors of Picrosirius red-stained collagens. Tightly packed and presumably, better aligned collagen molecules showed polarization colors of longer wavelengths. Thus, packing of collagen molecules and not only fiber thickness plays a role in the pattern of polarization colors of Picrosirius red-stained collagens.

Keywords

Collagen Collagen Type Longe Wavelength Type Versus Collagen Molecule 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. Dayan
    • 1
  • Y. Hiss
    • 2
  • A. Hirshberg
    • 1
  • J. J. Bubis
    • 3
  • M. Wolman
    • 3
  1. 1.Section of Oral Pathology and Oral Medicine, The Maurice and Gabriela Goldschleger School of Dental MedicineTel Aviv UniversityTel AvivIsrael
  2. 2.Greenberg Institute of Forensic MedicineTel AvivIsrael
  3. 3.Department of PathologyChaim Sheba Medical Center, and Tel Aviv University, Sackler Faculty of MedicineTel AvivIsrael

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