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Theoretical and Applied Genetics

, Volume 76, Issue 3, pp 420–424 | Cite as

In situ hybridization to somatic metaphase chromosomes of potato

  • R. G. F. Visser
  • R. Hoekstra
  • F. R. van der Leij
  • L. P. Pijnacker
  • B. Witholt
  • W. J. Feenstra
Article

Summary

An in situ hybridization procedure was developed for mitotic potato chromosomes by using a potato 24S rDNA probe. This repetitive sequence hybridized to the nucleolar organizer region (NOR) of chromosome 2 in 95%–100% of the metaphase plates. Another repetitive sequence (P5), isolated from the interdihaploid potato HH578, gave a “ladderpattern” in genomic Southern's of Solanum tuberosum and Solanum phureja, but not in those of Solanum brevidens and two Nicotiana species. This sequence hybridized predominantly on telomeric and centromeric regions of all chromosomes, although chromosomes 7, 8, 10 and 11 were not always labeled clearly.

Key words

In situ hybridization Mitotic chromosomes Potato Repetitive sequences 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. G. F. Visser
    • 1
  • R. Hoekstra
    • 1
  • F. R. van der Leij
    • 1
  • L. P. Pijnacker
    • 1
  • B. Witholt
    • 2
  • W. J. Feenstra
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of GeneticsUniversity of GroningenNN HarenThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Department of BiochemistryUniversity of GroningenAG GroningenThe Netherlands

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