Intensive Care Medicine

, Volume 14, Issue 5, pp 575–777 | Cite as

Bacteremia following cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation

  • P. Gaussorgues
  • P. -Y. Gueugniaud
  • J. -M. Vedrinne
  • F. Salord
  • A. Mercatello
  • D. Robert
Original Articles

Abstract

After but of hospital CPR thirty three resuscitated patients were studied for bacteremic complications. Thirteen patients (39%) had two or more positive blood cultures during the twelve hours following CPR. Source of superinfection was a central venous catheter in one case (staphylococcus). The twelve other bacteremic patients had fetid diarrhea a few hours after admission. The same organism were found in blood and faeces (streptococcus D, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, acinetobacter, enterobacter). Mesenteric ischemia caused by a low cardiac output may explain the diarrhea and the intestinal origin of the septicemia. All patients (12 cases) with diarrhoea and bacteremia died. Patients who recovered without neurologic sequelae (4 cases) had never been septic and never had diarrhea.

Key words

Cardiac arrest Cardiopulmonary resuscitation Bacteremia Diarrhea 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Gaussorgues
    • 1
  • P. -Y. Gueugniaud
    • 1
  • J. -M. Vedrinne
    • 2
  • F. Salord
    • 2
  • A. Mercatello
    • 2
  • D. Robert
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Intensive CareHopital Croix RousseLyonFrance
  2. 2.Respiratory Intensive Care UnitHopital Croix RousseLyonFrance

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