Urological Research

, Volume 17, Issue 2, pp 87–93

Structure and function of the androgen receptor

  • A. O. Brinkmann
  • P. Klaasen
  • G. G. J. M. Kuiper
  • J. A. G. M. van der Korput
  • J. Bolt
  • W. de Boer
  • A. Smit
  • P. W. Faber
  • H. C. J. van Rooij
  • A. Geurts van Kessel
  • M. M. Voorhorst
  • E. Mulder
  • J. Trapman
Original Articles

Summary

The androgen receptor in several species (human, rat, calf) is a monomeric protein with a molecular mass of 100–110kDa. The steroid binding domain is confined to a region of 30 kDa, while the DNA-binding domain has the size of approx. 10 kDa. A 40 kDa fragment containing both the DNA and steroid binding domain displayed a higher DNA binding activity than did the intact 100 kDa molecule. cDNA encoding the major part of the human androgen receptor was isolated. The cDNA contains an open reading frame of 2,277 bp but still lacks part of the 5′-coding sequence. Homology with the progesterone and glucocorticoid receptor was about 80% in the DNA binding domain and 50% in the steroid binding domain. The present data provide evidence that the androgen receptor belongs to the superfamily of ligand responsive transcriptional regulators and consists of three distinct domains each with a specialized function.

Key words

Androgen Receptor cDNA Structure Human 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. O. Brinkmann
    • 1
  • P. Klaasen
    • 2
  • G. G. J. M. Kuiper
    • 1
  • J. A. G. M. van der Korput
    • 2
  • J. Bolt
    • 1
  • W. de Boer
    • 1
  • A. Smit
    • 1
  • P. W. Faber
    • 2
  • H. C. J. van Rooij
    • 2
  • A. Geurts van Kessel
    • 3
  • M. M. Voorhorst
    • 1
  • E. Mulder
    • 1
  • J. Trapman
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Biochemistry IIErasmus UniversityRotterdamThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Department of PathologyErasmus UniversityRotterdamThe Netherlands
  3. 3.Department of Cell Biology and GeneticsErasmus UniversityRotterdamThe Netherlands

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