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Molecular and General Genetics MGG

, Volume 226, Issue 3, pp 361–366 | Cite as

Gene expression in nematode-infected plant roots

  • Sarah Jane Gurr
  • Michael J. McPherson
  • Claire Scollan
  • Howard J. Atkinson
  • Dianna J. Bowles
Article

Summary

A major pathogen of potato plants (Solanum tuberosum) is the potato cyst nematode (Globodera spp.), which induces localized redifferentiation of a limited number of host cells to form a specialized feeding-site termed the syncytium. A novel strategy utilizing the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was employed to construct a cDNA library from dissected potato roots highly enriched in syncytial material. The library was differentially screened with cDNA probes derived from the infected root tissue from a compatible interaction and from healthy root tissue. Characterization of one gene identified by the library screen indicated an expression pattern that correlated with events in the immediate vicinity of the pathogen after syncytial establishment. The strategy for library construction and screening could be applicable to the study of gene expression in any plant-pathogen interaction in which the limited supply of cells at the interface of the two organisms precludes a more traditional approach.

Key words

Gene expression Plant root Potato cyst nematode PCR cDNA library Syncytium 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sarah Jane Gurr
    • 1
  • Michael J. McPherson
    • 1
  • Claire Scollan
    • 1
    • 2
  • Howard J. Atkinson
    • 2
  • Dianna J. Bowles
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre for Plant Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular BiologyLeeds UniversityLeedsUK
  2. 2.Centre for Plant Biochemistry Department of Pure and Applied BiologyLeeds UniversityLeedsUK

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