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Molecular and General Genetics MGG

, Volume 219, Issue 3, pp 390–396 | Cite as

A class II patatin promoter is under developmental control in both transgenic potato and tobacco plants

  • Meike Köster-Töpfer
  • Wolf B. Frommer
  • Mario Rocha-Sosa
  • Sabine Rosahl
  • Jeff Schell
  • Lothar Willmitzer
Article

Summary

A new member of the patatin gene family belonging to the class II subfamily was isolated and characterized by DNA sequencing. In order to study the expression profile of this gene, the promoter was fused to the β-glucuronidase gene and transferred to potato and tobacco. Histochemical analysis revealed high expression in a few defined cells in potato tubers and in a specific layer of both potato and tobacco root tips. In contrast to the developmentally and metabolically regulated class I patatin gene B33 this gene was not inducible by elevated levels of sucrose. Expression of this chimaeric gene was also found in callus and suspension cultures of potato.

Key words

Class II patatin gene β-glucuronidase Transgenic potato Transgenic tobacco Root tip 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Meike Köster-Töpfer
    • 1
  • Wolf B. Frommer
    • 1
  • Mario Rocha-Sosa
    • 1
  • Sabine Rosahl
    • 1
  • Jeff Schell
    • 1
  • Lothar Willmitzer
    • 1
  1. 1.Institut für Genbiologische Forschung Berlin GmbHBerlin 33Germany

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