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Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology

, Volume 20, Issue 1, pp 29–32 | Cite as

The effect of citric acid concentration and pH on the submerged production of lysergic acid derivatives

  • E. Pertot
  • J. Čadež
  • S. Milicic
  • H. Sočič
Biotechnology

Summary

Succinic acid can just as well be replaced by citric acid in submerged fermentation of lysergic acid derivatives by a strain of Claviceps paspali. The highest alkaloid yields were obtained with a 1% citric acid concentration in the medium at a constant pH of 5.2. When the optimal pH was not maintained, growth was inhibited and all aspects of metabolic activity of the fungus were depressed.

Keywords

Fermentation Citric Acid Alkaloid Acid Concentration Metabolic Activity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. Pertot
    • 1
  • J. Čadež
    • 2
  • S. Milicic
    • 2
  • H. Sočič
    • 1
  1. 1.Boris Kidrič Institute of ChemistryLjubljanaYugoslavia
  2. 2.Pharmaceutical and Chemical WorksLEKLjubljanaYugoslavia

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