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Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology

, Volume 27, Issue 2, pp 117–120 | Cite as

Correlation between growth and ergot alkaloid biosynthesis in Claviceps purpurea batch fermentation

  • S. Miličić
  • M. Kremser
  • V. Gaberc-Porekar
  • M. Didek-Brumec
  • H. Sočič
Biotechnology

Summary

Following the growth kinetics of a C. purpurea ergotoxine-producing strain it was observed that alkaloid synthesis and alkaloid distribution depend on fungal growth velocity during idiophase. Formation of extracellular alkaloids is favoured by higher fungal growth velocity, while intracellular alkaloids begin to accumulate at a lower rate of growth. Simple lysergic acid derivatives prevali among extracellular alkaloids, whereas ergotoxines predominate among intracellular alkaloids. By varying cultivation conditions, by feeding the culture, or by varying the inoculum size, alkaloid composition can be influenced within the limits of strain capabilities.

Keywords

Fermentation Alkaloid Growth Kinetic Batch Fermentation Inoculum Size 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Miličić
    • 1
    • 2
  • M. Kremser
    • 1
    • 2
  • V. Gaberc-Porekar
    • 1
    • 2
  • M. Didek-Brumec
    • 1
    • 2
  • H. Sočič
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Boris Kidrič Institute of ChemistryLjubljanaYugoslavia
  2. 2.LEK, Pharmaceutical and Chemical WorksLjubljanaYugoslavia

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