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Archives of Microbiology

, Volume 156, Issue 3, pp 192–197 | Cite as

Chitinolytic properties of Streptomyces lividans

  • Ewa Neugebauer
  • Benoit Gamache
  • Claude V. Déry
  • Ryszard Brzezinski
Original Papers

Abstract

Streptomyces lividans TK24, an established host for genetic and molecular studies in actinomycetes, is able to use chitin as sole carbon and nitrogen source. Extracellular chitinase and N-acetyl-β-d-glucosamidinase (chitobiase) activities were detected in liquid cultures. Chitinase production was inducible by chitin and its low molecular weight derivatives. Low levels of chitinase were also produced in the absence of chitin. Production of extracellular N-acetylglucosaminidase was correlated with the beginning of the stationary phase of growth and was independent of the presence of chitin. Beside highly N-acetylated chitin, supernatants of chitin-induced cultures were able to hydrolyse chitosans with a wide range of degrees of N-acetylation.

Key words

Streptomyces lividans Chitin Chitosan Chitinase N-Acetylglucosaminidase 

Abbreviations

MS

minimal salts

GlcNAc

N-acetyl-β-d-glucosamine

pNP-GlcNAc

p-nitrophenyl-2-acetamido-2-deoxy-β-d-glucopyranoside

d.a.

degree of N-acetylation

TLC

thin-layer chromatography

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ewa Neugebauer
    • 1
  • Benoit Gamache
    • 1
  • Claude V. Déry
    • 1
  • Ryszard Brzezinski
    • 1
  1. 1.Département de Biologie, Faculté des SciencesUniversité de SherbrookeSherbrookeCanada

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