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Fluid replacement beverages and maintenance of plasma volume during exercise: role of aldosterone and vasopressin

  • David Criswell
  • Kevin Renshler
  • Scott K. Powers
  • Richard Tulley
  • Michael Cicale
Article

Summary

Previous experiments have demonstrated that consumption of a glucose polymer-electrolyte (GP-E) beverage is superior to water in minimizing exercise-induced decreases in plasma volume (PV). We tested the hypothesis that elevated plasma concentrations of vasopressin and/or aldosterone above that seen with water ingestion may explain this observation. Six trained cyclists performed 115 min of constant-load exercise (approximately 65% of maximal oxygen consumption) on a cycle ergometer on two occasions with 7 days separating experiments. Ambient conditions were maintained relatively constant for both exercise tests (29–30° C; 58–66% relative humidity). During each experiment, subjects consumed 400 ml of one of the following beverages 20 min prior to exercise and 275 ml immediately prior to and every 15 min during exercise: (1) distilled water or (2) GP-E drink contents = 7% carbohydrate (glucose polymers and fructose; 9 mmol·1−1 sodium; 5 mmol·1−1 potassium; osmolality 250 mosmol·1−1). No significant difference (P>0.05) existed in mean skin temperature, rectal temperature, oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production or the respiratory exchange ratio between treatments. Further, no significant differences existed in plasma osmolality and plasma concentrations of sodium, potassium, chloride or magnesium between treatments. Plasma volume was better maintained (P<0.05) in the GP-E trial at 90 and 120 min of exercise when compared to the water treatment. No differences existed in plasma levels of vasopressin or aldosterone between treatments at any measurement period. Further, the correlation coefficients between plasma concentrations of vasopressin and aldosterone and change in PV during exercise were 0.42 (P<0.05) and 0.16 (P>0.05), respectively. Therefore, although these experiments support the notion that a GP-E beverage is superior to water in minimizing exercise-induced disturbances in PV during prolonged exercise, the mechanism to explain this observation is not due to differences in plasma concentrations of vasopressin or aldosterone alone.

Key words

Plasma volume Fluid replacement Prolonged exercise Hypovolemia Hydration 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • David Criswell
    • 1
  • Kevin Renshler
    • 1
  • Scott K. Powers
    • 1
  • Richard Tulley
    • 1
  • Michael Cicale
    • 1
  1. 1.Keith Wheeler Center for Exercise Science, Departments of Exercise and Sport Sciences, Physiology, and MedicineUniversity of FloridaGainesvilleUSA

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