Effects of body morphology and mass on thermal responses to cold water: revisited

  • E. L. Glickman-Weiss
  • A. G. Nelson
  • C. M. Hearon
  • F. L. Goss
  • R. J. Robertson
  • D. A. Cassinelli
Article

Summary

Seven male volunteers were divided into two groups based on body morphology and mass. The large body mass (LM) group (n = 4) was 21.2 kg heavier and 0.32 m2 · kg −1 smaller in surface area-to-mass ratio (P< 0.05) than the small body mass (SM) group (n = 3) Both groups were similar in total body fat and regional skinfold thicknesses. All subjects were immersed to the first thoracic vertebrae for 120 min in stirred water at 18°C. Overall, tissue insulation was similar (P>0.05) between the SM and LM groups across time. Perceptual ratings of thermal sensation increased (P<0.05) across time. Therefore, as cold water immersion progressed, tissue insulation was similar and thermal sensation increased (P<0.05) in males matched for subcutaneous fat and total fat but differing in body mass and morphology.

key words

Tissue insulation Water immersion Thermoregulation Body morphology Surface area-tomass-ratio 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. L. Glickman-Weiss
    • 1
  • A. G. Nelson
    • 1
  • C. M. Hearon
    • 1
  • F. L. Goss
    • 2
  • R. J. Robertson
    • 2
  • D. A. Cassinelli
  1. 1.Department of KinesiologyLouisiana State UniversityBaton RougeUSA
  2. 2.Human Energy LabUniversity of PittsburghPittsburghUSA
  3. 3.Louisiana State UniversityBaton RougeUSA

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