Experimental Brain Research

, Volume 62, Issue 1, pp 215–223 | Cite as

The proportion and size of GABA-immunoreactive neurons in the magnocellular and parvocellular layers of the lateral geniculate nucleus of the rhesus monkey

  • V. M. Montero
  • J. Zempel
Research Note

Summary

Neurons containing GABA-immunoreactivity in LGN of the macaque monkey were analyzed quantitatively in semithin (1 μm) sections. The percentage of GABA(+) cells per unit area of the sections was 26% in the magnocellular layers and 19% in the parvocellular layers. However, the percentage of GABA(+) cells in a unit volume of LGN, calculated by a stereological method that takes into account the observed difference in size of labeled and unlabeled somata, was 35% in the magnocellular layers and 25% in the parvocellular layers. GABA(+) somata in the magnocellular layers were significantly larger than those in the parvocellular layers. The possible role of GABAergic cells in inhibitory mechanisms of receptive fields of parvo- and magnocellular neurons are discussed in the light of current knowledge of the physiology and neural circuits of macaque LGN.

Key words

Dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus GABA Inhibition Interneurons Immunocytochemistry 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. M. Montero
    • 1
  • J. Zempel
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of NeurophysiologyWaisman Center, University of WisconsinMadisonUSA

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