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Experimental Brain Research

, Volume 84, Issue 3, pp 668–671 | Cite as

Reorganization of activity in the supplementary motor area associated with motor learning and functional recovery

  • H. Aizawa
  • M. Inase
  • H. Mushiake
  • K. Shima
  • J. Tanji
Research Note

Summary

The supplementary motor area (SMA) of primates has been implicated in the initiation and execution of limb movements. However, when a motor task was extensively overlearned, few SMA neurons, if any, were active before the movement onset. Subsequent lesions of the primary motor cortex gave rise to the appearance of premovement activity changes, indicating usedependent reorganization of the neuronal activity in SMA.

Key words

Supplementary motor area Cerebral cortex Motor learning Plasticity Neuron Monkey 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Aizawa
    • 1
  • M. Inase
    • 1
  • H. Mushiake
    • 1
  • K. Shima
    • 1
  • J. Tanji
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PhysiologyTohoku University, School of MedicineSendaiJapan

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