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Experimental Brain Research

, Volume 78, Issue 1, pp 164–173 | Cite as

Distribution of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-immunoreactive astrocytes in the rat brain

II. Mesencephalon, rhombencephalon and spinal cord
  • F. Hajós
  • M. Kálmán
Article

Summary

The topographical mapping of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-immunoreactivity was performed in coronal serial sections of the rat mesencephalon, rhombencephalon and spinal cord. Relative to a background of poor or moderate overall staining of the mesencephalon, the interpeduncular nucleus, substantia nigra and the periaqueductal grey matter were prominent by their intense GFAP-immunoreactivity. The pons and particularly the medulla contained more GFAP-labelled elements compared with the mesencephalon. The spinal trigeminal nucleus and Rolando substance were distinguished by their intense staining. Large fibre tracts were usually poor in immunoreactive GFAP. In a concluding discussion, findings relevant to the GFAP-mapping of the whole rat CNS are evaluated with regard to possible reasons underlying the observed differential distribution of GFAP-immunoreactivity.

Key words

Glia GFAP Brainstem Spinal cord Immunocytochemistry Rat 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. Hajós
    • 1
  • M. Kálmán
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Anatomy and HistologyUniversity of Veterinary ScienceBudapestHungary
  2. 2.First Department of AnatomySemmelweis University Medical SchoolBudapestHungary

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