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Theoretical and Applied Genetics

, Volume 83, Issue 1, pp 49–57 | Cite as

RFLP maps of potato and their alignment with the homoeologous tomato genome

  • C. Gebhardt
  • E. Ritter
  • A. Barone
  • T. Debener
  • B. Walkemeier
  • U. Schachtschabel
  • H. Kaufmann
  • R. D. Thompson
  • M. W. Bonierbale
  • M. W. Ganal
  • S. D. Tanksley
  • F. Salamini
Originals

Summary

An RFLP linkage map of the potato is presented which comprises 304 loci derived from 230 DNA probes and one morphological marker (tuber skin color). The self-incompatibility locus of potato was mapped to chromosome I, which is homoeologous to tomato chromosome I. By mapping chromosome-specific tomato RFLP markers in potato and, vice versa, potato markers in tomato, the different potato and tomato RFLP maps were aligned to each other and the similarity of the potato and tomato genome was confirmed. The numbers given to the 12 potato chromosomes are now in accordance with the established tomato nomenclature. Comparisons between potato RFLP maps derived from different genetic backgrounds revealed conservation of marker order but differences in chromosome and total map length. In particular, significant reduction of map length was observed in interspecific compared to intraspecific crosses. The distribution of regions with distorted segregation ratios in the genome was analyzed for four potato parents. The most prominent distortion of recombination was found to be caused by the self-incompatibility locus.

Key words

RFLP Potato Tomato Genetic maps 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. Gebhardt
    • 1
  • E. Ritter
    • 1
  • A. Barone
    • 2
  • T. Debener
    • 1
  • B. Walkemeier
    • 1
  • U. Schachtschabel
    • 1
  • H. Kaufmann
    • 1
  • R. D. Thompson
    • 1
  • M. W. Bonierbale
    • 3
  • M. W. Ganal
    • 3
  • S. D. Tanksley
    • 3
  • F. Salamini
    • 1
  1. 1.Max-Planck-Institute for Plant Breeding ResearchCologne 30Germany
  2. 2.Department of Agronomy and Plant GeneticsUniversity of NaplesPorticiItaly
  3. 3.Department of Plant Breeding and BiometryCornell UniversityIthacaUSA

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