Theoretical and Applied Genetics

, Volume 82, Issue 5, pp 537–544 | Cite as

Isolation and characterization of wheat-rye recombinants involving chromosome arm 1DS of wheat

  • P. M. Rogowsky
  • F. L. Y. Guidet
  • P. Langridge
  • K. W. Shepherd
  • R. M. D. Koebner
Originals

Summary

The introgression of genetic material from alien species is assuming increased importance in wheat breeding programs. One example is the translocation of the short arm of rye chromosome 1 (1RS) onto homoeologous wheat chromosomes, which confers disease resistance and increased yield on wheat. However, this translocation is also associated with dough quality defects. To break the linkage between the desirable agronomic traits and poor dough quality, recombination has been induced between 1RS and the homoeologous wheat arm IDS. Seven new recombinants were isolated, with five being similar to those reported earlier and two havina new type of structure. All available recombinantsw ere characterized with DNA probes for the loci Nor-R1, 5SDna-R1, and Tel-R1. Also, the amount of rye chromatin present was quantified with a dispersed rye-specific repetitive DNA sequence in quantitative dot blots. Furthermore, the wheat-rye recombinants were used as a mapping tool to assign two RFLP markers to specific regions on chromosome arms 1DS and 1RS of wheat and rye, respectively.

Key words

Wheat-rye recombinants Homoeologous recombination Repetitive DNA sequences RFLP markers mapping 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. M. Rogowsky
    • 1
  • F. L. Y. Guidet
    • 1
  • P. Langridge
    • 1
  • K. W. Shepherd
    • 1
  • R. M. D. Koebner
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Cereal Biotechnology, Waite Agricultural Research InstituteThe University of AdelaideGlen OsmondAustralia

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