Theoretical and Applied Genetics

, Volume 91, Issue 4, pp 582–588

Template mixing: a method of enhancing detection and interpretation of codominant RAPD markers

  • T. M. Davis
  • H. Yu
  • K. M. Haigis
  • P. J. McGowan
Article

Abstract

Ten codominant RAPD markers, ranging in size from about 300 to about 1350 bp, were identified in mapping populations of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) and diploid strawberry (Fragaria vesca L.). A distinguishing feature of all ten markers, and perhaps of codominant RAPD markers in general, was the presence in heterozygous individuals of a non-parental, heteroduplex band migrating more slowly than either of the respective parental bands. This non-parental band could also be generated by mixing parental DNAs before PCR (template mixing). As a means of identifying primers likely to detect codominant RAPD markers, parental and mixed-template (parent-parent) PCR-product gel lanes were compared for 20 previously untested RAPD primers (10-base oligomers). Four primers that produced a total of five non-parental, heteroduplex bands in mixed-template reactions were selected, and then used to detect a total of five segregating, codominant markers and nine dominant markers in the respective F2 mapping population, a codominant marker frequency of 35.7%. When closely migrating fast and slow bands of codominant RAPDs were difficult to differentiate, parent-progeny template mixing was used to deliberately generate heteroduplex bands in fast- or slow-band F2 homozygotes, respectively, allowing confirmation of marker phenotype.

Key words

RAPD markers Codominant Template mixing Heteroduplex DNA Genome mapping 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. M. Davis
    • 1
  • H. Yu
    • 1
  • K. M. Haigis
    • 1
  • P. J. McGowan
    • 1
  1. 1.Plant Biology DepartmentUniversity of New HampshireDurhamUSA

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