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Theoretical and Applied Genetics

, Volume 90, Issue 7–8, pp 1169–1173 | Cite as

Sensitivity of random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis to detect genetic change in sugarcane during tissue culture

  • P. W. J. Taylor
  • J. R. Geijskes
  • H.-L. Ko
  • T. A. Fraser
  • R. J. Henry
  • R. G. Birch
Article

Abstract

Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis using 10-mer oligonucleotide primers efficiently differentiated sugarcane cultivars and proved suitable for detecting gross genetic change such as that which can occur in sugarcane subjected to prolonged tissue culture, for example in protoplast-derived callus. However, RAPD analysis was not sufficiently sensitive to detect smaller genetic changes that occur during sugarcane genetic transformation. The length of DNA scored for polymorphism per primer averaged 13.2 kb, or 0.0001% of the typical sugarcane genome size of 1.2 × 107 kb (2C). RAPD analysis of sugarcane plants regenerated from embryogenic callus revealed very few polymorphisms, indicating that gross genetic change is infrequent during this tissue culture procedure, although epigenetic effects result in transient morphological changes in regenerated plants. More sensitive variations on the RAPD technique may increase the practicality of DNA-based screening of regenerated plant lines to reveal somaclonal variants.

Key words

RAPD Sugarcane Embryogenic callus Genetic transformation Somaclonal variation 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. W. J. Taylor
    • 1
  • J. R. Geijskes
    • 2
  • H.-L. Ko
    • 3
  • T. A. Fraser
    • 1
  • R. J. Henry
    • 3
  • R. G. Birch
    • 2
  1. 1.Bureau of Sugar Experiment StationsIndooroopillyAustralia
  2. 2.Department of BotanyThe University of QueenslandAustralia
  3. 3.Queensland Agricultural Biotechnology Centre, Gehrmann Laboratories, The University of QueenslandAustralia

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