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Immunogenetics

, Volume 37, Issue 6, pp 455–460 | Cite as

A multigene family on human chromosome 12 encodes natural killer-cell lectins

  • Toshio Yabe
  • Cynthia McSherry
  • Fritz H. Bach
  • Paul Fisch
  • Rebecca P. Schall
  • Paul M. Sondel
  • Jeffrey P. Houchins
Original Articles

Abstract

We previously isolated a series of cDNA clones designated NKG2-A, B, C, and D from a human natural killer (NK) cell library. These transcripts encode a family of type II integral membrane proteins having an extracellular Ca2+-dependent lectin domain. The predicted peptides share structural similarities and amino acid sequence similarity with known receptor molecules. In this report, the genomic organization and mRNA expression of each of the genes were studied by using transcript-specific probes. Southern blot experiments reveal that the probes cross-hybridize with a maximum of five genes at high stringency. By probing a Southern blot prepared from a series of hamster/human hybrid somatic cell lines, we demonstrated that all of the hybridizing fragments occur on human chromosome 12. No gene rearrangement and little restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) was observed with these probes. mRNA expression of the NKG2 genes occured in NK cells and some T cells but not in other hematopoietic cell types or in other tissues tested. Each of the transcripts occurred in all three of the NK cell lines tested: however, the genes were differentially regulated in T cells. NKG2-D was expressed in nine of fourteen T-cell clones or lines in the panel, whereas NKG2-A/B was expressed in three and NKG2-C was expressed in only one. Expression of each of the transcripts was upregulated following T-cell growth factor (TCGF)-induced activation of a cloned NK cell. The limited distribution of these proteins and their sequence similarity with known receptor molecules suggest that they may function as receptors of human NK cells.

Keywords

Natural Killer Cell Southern Blot Receptor Molecule Amino Acid Sequence Similarity Hybrid Somatic Cell 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Toshio Yabe
    • 1
  • Cynthia McSherry
    • 1
  • Fritz H. Bach
    • 1
  • Paul Fisch
    • 2
  • Rebecca P. Schall
    • 2
  • Paul M. Sondel
    • 3
  • Jeffrey P. Houchins
    • 1
  1. 1.Immunobiology Research Center, Departments of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology and SurgeryUniversity of MinnesotaMinneapolisUSA
  2. 2.Department of Human OncologyUniversity of WisconsinMadisonUSA
  3. 3.Departments of Pediatrics, Human Oncology, and GeneticsUniversity of WisconsinMadisonUSA

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