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Cell and Tissue Research

, Volume 232, Issue 1, pp 221–236 | Cite as

5-HT-like immunoreactivity in the central nervous system of the crayfish, Pacifastacus leniusculus

  • R. Elofsson
Article

Summary

An immunocytochemical technique with the use of three different antibodies raised against serotonin was applied to localize the immunoreactive neurons in the central nervous system of the crayfish, Pacifastacus leniusculus. Immunoreactive neurons were found in three optic ganglia (medulla externa, interna and terminalis). They appeared in three layers of the medulla externa and interna. The medulla terminalis displayed three prominent groups of immunoreactive perikarya and mainly marginal immunoreactive fibres. Immunoreactive areas of the brain comprised the protocerebral bridge, central body, paracentral lobes and two loci in the anterior portion of the protocerebrum, i.e., the terminal areas for immunoreactive fibres from the optic centres. The olfactory lobes showed a specific immunoreactive pattern. In addition, diffusely and sparsely distributed immunoreactive fibres were found throughout the brain. The immunoreactive neurons are largely localized in the same areas of the central nervous system as the catecholaminergic neurons although some distinct differences occur.

Key words

Serotonin Immunoreactive neurons Central nervous system Crayfish 

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Refrences

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH & Co. KG 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Elofsson
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of ZoologyUniversity of LundLundSweden

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