Theoretical and Applied Genetics

, Volume 90, Issue 2, pp 247–252 | Cite as

Application of two microsatellite sequences in wheat storage proteins as molecular markers

  • K. M. Devos
  • G. J. Bryan
  • A. J. Collins
  • P. Stephenson
  • M. D. Gale
Article

Abstract

In eukaryotes, tandem arrays of simple-sequence repeat sequences can find applications as highly variable and multi-allelic PCR-based genetic markers. In hexaploid bread wheat, a large-genome inbreeding species with low levels of RFLP, di- and trinucleotide tandem repeats were found in 22 published gene sequences, two of which were converted to PCR-based markers. These were shown to be genome-specific and displayed high levels of variation. These characteristics make them especially suitable for intervarietal breeding applications.

Key words

Wheat Microsatellite markers 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. M. Devos
    • 1
  • G. J. Bryan
    • 1
  • A. J. Collins
    • 1
  • P. Stephenson
    • 1
  • M. D. Gale
    • 1
  1. 1.Cambridge Laboratory, John Innes CentreColneyUK

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