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Cell and Tissue Research

, Volume 236, Issue 3, pp 597–600 | Cite as

Identification of the acid proteinase in human seminal fluid as a gastricsin originating in the prostate

  • W. A. Reid
  • L. Vongsorasak
  • J. Svasti
  • M. J. Valler
  • J. Kay
Article

Summary

On the basis of a) kinetic data obtained with a synthetic substrate and two peptide inhibitors and b) immunological cross-reactivity, it is shown that the aspartic proteinase of human seminal fluid is a gastricsin. The source of the precursor (progastricsin) in the male genital tract is identified to be the prostate.

Key words

Seminal fluid Acid proteinase Prostate gland Gastricsin 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. A. Reid
    • 1
  • L. Vongsorasak
    • 2
  • J. Svasti
    • 2
  • M. J. Valler
    • 3
  • J. Kay
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of PathologyRoyal InfirmaryGlasgowScotland
  2. 2.Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of ScienceMahidol UniversityBangkokThailand
  3. 3.Department of BiochemistryUniversity CollegeCardiffUK

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