Wetlands Ecology and Management

, Volume 2, Issue 3, pp 135–142 | Cite as

Wetland vegetation ecology on a reclaimed coal surface mine in southern Illinois, USA

  • C. Andrew Cole
Article

Abstract

An early successional wetland complex on a reclaimed surface coal mine in southern Illinois was studied 1985–1987. Seasonally, biomass was low, with above-ground values of 10–210g m−2 and below-ground biomass of 1.5–2435 g m−2. Biomass peaked in spring and did not vary much throughout the remainder of the growing season. Stem densities were high (179–1467 m−2) because large numbers of seedlings became established as falling water levels exposed large areas of mudflats. Fluctuating water levels led to a lack of community zonation. Species diversity (H′) was low to moderate over all sites with diversity values ranging between 1.86 and 3.27.

Keywords

Biomass reclamation surface mines vegetation communities wetland development wetlands 

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Copyright information

© SPB Academic Publishing bv 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. Andrew Cole
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of ZoologySouthern Illinois UniversityCarbondaleU.S.A.

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