European Biophysics Journal

, Volume 24, Issue 2, pp 107–115 | Cite as

Inward rectifier potassium channels in plants differ from their animal counterparts in response to voltage and channel modulators

  • R. Hedrich
  • O. Moran
  • F. Conti
  • H. Busch
  • D. Becker
  • F. Gambale
  • I. Dreyer
  • A. Küch
  • K. Neuwinger
  • K. Palme
Article

Abstract

We have investigated the electrophysiological basis of potassium inward rectification of the KAT1 gene product from Arabidopsis thaliana expressed in Xenopus oocytes and of functionally related K+ channels in the plasma membrane of guard and root cells from Vicia faba and Zea mays. The whole-cell currents passed by these channels activate, following steps to membrane potentials more negative than −100 mV, with half activation times of tens of milliseconds. This voltage dependence was unaffected by the removal of cytoplasmic magnesium. Consequently, unlike inward rectifier channels of animals, inward rectification of plant potassium channels is an intrinsic property of the channel protein itself. We also found that the activation kinetics of KAT1 were modulated by external pH. Decreasing the pH in the range 8.5 to 4.5 hastened activation and shifted the steady state activation curve by 19 mV per pH unit. This indicates that the activity of these K+ channels and the activity of the plasma membrane H+-ATPase may not only be coordinated by membrane potential but also by pH. The instantaneous current-voltage relationship, on the other hand, did not depend on pH, indicating that H+ do not block the channel. In addition to sensitivity towards protons, the channels showed a high affinity voltage dependent block in the presence of cesium, but were less sensitive to barium. Recordings from membrane patches of KAT1 injected oocytes in symmetric, Mg2+-free, 100 mM-K+, solutions allowed measurements of the current-voltage relation of single open KAT1 channels with a unitary conductance of 5 pS. We conclude that the inward rectification of the currents mediated by the KAT1 gene product, or the related endogenous channels of plant cells, results from voltage-modulated structural changes within the channel proteins. The voltage-sensing or the gating-structures appear to interact with a titratable acidic residue exposed to the extracellular medium.

Key words

Potassium channel KAT1 Voltage dependence Cesium block pH dependence Kinetics 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Hedrich
    • 1
  • O. Moran
    • 2
  • F. Conti
    • 2
  • H. Busch
    • 1
  • D. Becker
    • 1
  • F. Gambale
    • 2
  • I. Dreyer
    • 1
  • A. Küch
    • 3
  • K. Neuwinger
    • 1
  • K. Palme
    • 3
  1. 1.Institut für BiophysikUniversität HannoverHannoverGermany
  2. 2.Istituto di Cibernetica e BiofisicaC.N.R.GenovaItaly
  3. 3.Max-Planck-Institut für ZüchtungsforschungKölnGermany

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